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A Journey Into Deep Space

A Journey Into Deep Space

Ready for a jour­ney into deep space? Space and galax­ies have always fas­ci­nat­ed me, so when the book Cos­mic Clouds 3D by David Eich­er and Bri­an May was released in 2020, I got the idea of con­vert­ing my tra­di­tion­al space paint­ings into 3D by using a depthmap. But I realised that the result was far from sat­is­fy­ing. So I switched from can­vas to dig­i­tal art­work, which has the advan­tage of being eas­i­er to con­vert into a stereo­scop­ic draw­ing than a tra­di­tion­al one. 

Deep space stereo drawings

Deep space stereo drawings

Ready for a jour­ney into deep space? Then why not cre­ate your own uni­verse by draw­ing it? Space and galax­ies have always fas­ci­nat­ed me and when I start­ed paint­ing some years ago I cre­at­ed sev­er­al galax­ies in the clas­si­cal way — in 2D on can­vas. A lit­tle lat­er, I got the idea of con­vert­ing my paint­ings into 3D. Final­ly, I switched from can­vas to dig­i­tal artwork.

Translucent stereoscopic symmetry

The work being dis­played in this gallery I call dou­ble expo­sure stereo­scop­ic images. I start with a stereo­scop­ic image in side by side “par­al­lel view” for­mat and process the images for the left and the right eye sep­a­rate­ly. I use an image edi­tor to pro­duce 

Stereo cards from modern times

Stereo cards from modern times

I present you a series of mod­ern stereo cards, inspired by the Vic­to­ri­an way of depict­ing real­i­ty: Stereo­scop­ic pho­tog­ra­phy. I’ve been inspired and fas­ci­nat­ed by the atmos­phere of old stereo­scop­ic cards, which were, in their time, the most real­is­tic way to immor­tal­ize and then relive the mem­o­ries dri­ven by the sight of a par­tic­u­lar scene. I show you how to cre­ate your own mod­ern stereo card in 10 minutes!

Villa Ecclesiae

Villa Ecclesiae

The cen­ter­piece of these stere­oviews is Igle­sias, in the province of South Sar­dinia, Italy. It was found­ed in 1258, and its orig­i­nal name was Vil­la Ecclesiae.

A breeze from Brazil

A breeze from Brazil

The vil­lage stere­os por­trays the charm­ing his­tor­i­cal cen­ter of the city of Tiradentes, in Minas Gerais, Brazil, one of my favorite places.

Michael Burr’s Favourite Model

Michael Burr’s Favourite Model

Michael Burr was one of the most pro­lif­ic pho­tog­ra­phers of staged genre stere­oviews in the Vic­to­ri­an era. Like most pho­tog­ra­phers Burr had his favourite mod­els who make reg­u­lar appear­ances in his tableaux. One of them, and per­haps the most rel­e­vant to read­ers of this arti­cle, appeared as the wife of a stere­o­graph enthu­si­ast who, while her hus­band is occu­pied in scru­ti­n­is­ing the lat­est offer­ings from the trav­el­ling stereo sales­man, takes the oppor­tu­ni­ty to flirt with the top-hat­ted pur­vey­or of 3D delights.

Beneath the waves

Beneath the waves

Once becom­ing a div­er in 2004, it was only a mat­ter of time before I took my love of stereo pho­tog­ra­phy beneath the waves. When div­ing, you are nev­er sure exact­ly what you will find, but inevitably some­thing won­der­ful appears before you. Don’t miss these stun­ning under­wa­ter 3D photos!

“Tissues” or “The Happiness of the Collector in Collecting”

“Tissues” or “The Happiness of the Collector in Collecting”

What to do in 2020, these dif­fi­cult times for pas­sion­ate col­lec­tors? Read about Thomas Asch’s newest acqui­si­tion, get some his­tor­i­cal back­ground infor­ma­tion and look at the dif­fer­ent kinds of stereo­scop­ic Tissues.

Symbiosis of art — a sculptor’s stereo photos

Symbiosis of art — a sculptor’s stereo photos

Unlike paint­ing, in sculp­ture, the per­cep­tion of spa­tial depth may be the most impor­tant thing to con­sid­er. The rela­tion­ship of each of the ele­ments dis­trib­uted in the space is the real chal­lenge to take into account in cre­at­ing sculp­ture. In the vast major­i­ty of cas­es, col­or is dis­pensed with to focus atten­tion on three-dimen­sion­al shapes. In a tra­di­tion­al two-dimen­sion­al pho­to­graph of a sculp­ture that per­cep­tion of depth is lost, and there­fore two-dimen­sion­al pho­tog­ra­phy is a very inef­fec­tive means to rep­re­sent the spa­tial aware­ness of a sculpture.