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Negative Notions: Proper digitization of stereoscopic negatives for parallel viewing

Negative Notions: Proper digitization of stereoscopic negatives for parallel viewing

Stereo­scop­ic neg­a­tives are, by nature of their cre­ation, trick­i­er drag­ons to con­quer than are those made by tra­di­tion­al two-dimen­sion­al cam­eras. They are vicious chimeras, prod­ucts of dis­tinct pho­to­graph­ic and stere­o­graph­ic process­es, and dif­fi­cult to tame. Read here how to do it.

The Autochrome project

The Autochrome project

The Autochrome was one of the prin­ci­pal ways of pro­duc­ing colour pho­tog­ra­phy in the ear­ly 20th Cen­tu­ry. The Autochrome Project is a per­son­al endeav­our to pro­duce a work­able method of recre­at­ing the Lumiere Autochrome.

An Abbreviated History of Stereo-Pair Illustrated books

An Abbreviated History of Stereo-Pair Illustrated books

Every now and then you can find stereo illus­trat­ed books that incor­po­rate a view­er, to view the print­ed stereo pairs, rather than anaglyphs. This basic con­cept and for­mat turns out to be quite old. Read more about it in David Starkman’s abbre­vi­at­ed his­to­ry of Stereo Illus­trat­ed books.

Shafts of light

Shafts of light

I’m for­tu­nate to be an ear­ly ris­er and love being in my favourite local places just as the sun ris­es. When you’re there and move, the shafts of light move when you do; when viewed in 3‑D they seem to form an almost sol­id part of the scene.

Stereo Window basics

Stereo Window basics

writ­ten for the stere­osite by David Kuntz (Ran­cho Palos Verdes, Cal­i­for­nia, USA) Stereo pho­tog­ra­phy is a bit more demand­ing than tra­di­tion­al flat pho­tog­ra­phy, because a poor­ly ren­dered 3D image can be dif­fi­cult or unpleas­ant to view.  So, the stereo pho­tog­ra­ph­er has to take addi­tion­al steps, not 

Collecting Stereoscopes

Collecting Stereoscopes

In this post, I will talk about col­lect­ing antique stere­o­scopes for glass stere­oviews from the peri­od 1850 to 1930. Some tips from my pre­vi­ous post can also be applied to stere­o­scopes, so I rec­om­mend to read this post first. How­ev­er, col­lect­ing stere­o­scopes comes with some addi­tion­al chal­lenges that I will address now.

Collecting Stereoviews

Collecting Stereoviews

This is the first post of a two-part series about col­lect­ing stere­oscopy antiques. This post is about col­lect­ing stere­oviews. André tells about his expe­ri­ences based on two years of search­ing and bid­ding on glass stere­oviews of the First World War, but in gen­er­al these tips apply to all themes.

Getting started with Catadioptric stereos (Mirror stereos)

Getting started with Catadioptric stereos (Mirror stereos)

You may or may not know that adding a small hand­held mir­ror to your stereo arse­nal can help you over­come many of the com­mon ‘cha-cha’ prob­lems. With the mir­ror reflect­ing half of the camera’s view, you can cap­ture an entire stere­opair in a sin­gle shot, elim­i­nat­ing tim­ing-relat­ed issues. Read a step-by-step guide here.

Catadioptric stereo photography (Mirror stereos)

Catadioptric stereo photography (Mirror stereos)

All of these stereo pho­tos were tak­en with a sin­gle shot — the only fur­ther equip­ment you need is a mir­ror.

A Multiview Stereoscope Comparison

A Multiview Stereoscope Comparison

Mul­ti­view stere­o­scopes are table stere­o­scopes that are capa­ble of show­ing mul­ti­ple images in one view­ing ses­sion. These view­ers use a slide tray or chain in which the stere­oviews are placed. By turn­ing a crank or push­ing down a lever, the images are dis­played one by one.