Mid-Century 35 mm Filmstrip Stereo Viewers

Mid-Century 35 mm Filmstrip Stereo Viewers

3D film­strip view­ers are a fam­i­ly of stereo view­ers that gained promi­nence in the ear­ly 20th cen­tu­ry. In fact, it was a small film­strip view­er called Tru-Vue that re-intro­duced 3D view­ing as a mid-cen­tu­ry pas­time, made it more afford­able than ear­li­er stere­o­scope sets, and paved the way in the hearts and minds of con­sumers for the pop­u­lar 3D reel & card view­ers that would come lat­er. For this rea­son, Tru-Vue has often been called “the miss­ing link” in stere­oscopy. Explore some of the most inter­est­ing film­strip stereo view­ers here.

Restoring Stereoscopic Antiques

Restoring Stereoscopic Antiques

When con­sid­er­ing restora­tion, I always ask myself one very sim­ple ques­tion: What would this stere­o­scope look like today if it had nev­er dis­ap­peared from its owner’s liv­ing room, but had been cher­ished and cared for con­tin­u­ous­ly for over 100 years?

Collecting Stereoscopes

Collecting Stereoscopes

In this post, I will talk about col­lect­ing antique stere­o­scopes for glass stere­oviews from the peri­od 1850 to 1930. Some tips from my pre­vi­ous post can also be applied to stere­o­scopes, so I rec­om­mend to read this post first. How­ev­er, col­lect­ing stere­o­scopes comes with some addi­tion­al chal­lenges that I will address now.

A Multiview Stereoscope Comparison

A Multiview Stereoscope Comparison

Mul­ti­view stere­o­scopes are table stere­o­scopes that are capa­ble of show­ing mul­ti­ple images in one view­ing ses­sion. These view­ers use a slide tray or chain in which the stere­oviews are placed. By turn­ing a crank or push­ing down a lever, the images are dis­played one by one.