Gallery

On this site you find some mod­ern stereopho­tos of var­i­ous mem­bers of the com­mu­ni­ty. I’m real­ly hap­py to have got­ten per­mis­sion to show them here. If pos­si­ble I’ve added a link to their own web­site or social media and I high­ly rec­om­mend to pay them a vis­it. Among them are also some stere­os I’ve tak­en myself. Unless oth­er­wise stat­ed all images are pro­vid­ed for par­al­lel viewing.

If you want to know more about how to view these images, take a look at View­ing meth­ods. For any­one who feels more com­fort­able by using a view­er the LSC Lite OWL is a good choice for view­ing par­al­lel stere­os on screen.

Prob­a­bly you’ll need to adjust the image size for a bet­ter view­ing expe­ri­ence. The short­cuts crtl + [+] and crtl + [-] work for most browsers. Crtl + 0 brings every­thing back to it’s orig­i­nal size. If you have a Mac use cmd instead of ctrl in these shortcuts.


Latest galleries:

  • A trip through Spain in 3D

    These are some 3D pho­tos that I’ve made this sum­mer dur­ing my jour­ney through dif­fer­ent parts of Spain. Spain is a very diverse coun­try, full of spec­tac­u­lar cities, mon­u­ments and nat­ur­al wonders.

    © 2022 Sonia Vílchez Molina

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    Sonia Vílchez Molina (Seville, Spain)

    I’m born in 2004 and in my first year at uni­ver­si­ty study­ing Physics, and I would like to become an astro­physi­cist in the future. I love read­ing, lis­ten­ing to music, play­ing the gui­tar and the piano and, of course, tak­ing 3D pho­tos. I start­ed mak­ing stere­os in 2021, and now it has become one of my biggest hob­bies.

    Insta­gram-pro­file: soniavm2004

  • Stone and Water — A 3D Jour­ney through Bruges

    The canals of Bruges have con­nect­ed the city to the sea for cen­turies. Inter­na­tion­al mer­chants guar­an­teed wealth and pros­per­i­ty. Bruges soon became one of the largest Hanse cities. Until today, the medieval build­ings and struc­tures of the 15th cen­tu­ry remained main­ly intact. UNESCO des­ig­nat­ed the entire city cen­tre as a World Her­itage site in 2000.

    These stereo pho­tos where tak­en with two synced iPhones 11 Pro mount­ed on a rig. Two com­bined vol­ume con­trols served as a remote shut­ter. This set up is my per­son­al approach to com­bine the advan­tages of a twin cam­era set­up with the light weight of a smart­phone and its abil­i­ty for edit­ing and post-pro­cess­ing the stereo pairs.

    © 2022 Pas­cal Martiné

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    Pascal Martiné (Mainz, Germany)

    Pas­sion­ate about stere­oscopy as a col­lec­tor and pho­tog­ra­ph­er since 2016. Admin of the stere­osite. More on About me.

  • Shake it up with 3D Wig­gles

    FLASH WARNING — The con­tent below con­tains flash­ing images.

    3D wig­gle­grams, or wig­gles for short, are 2 or more stereo images stitched togeth­er to cre­ate a sense of depth in the form of a video or GIF. The wig­gles that I am show­ing are made from the 35mm shots on my RETO3D camera.

    I like that wig­gles are as if some­one pushed pause around a moment or scene and it glitched. I’m specif­i­cal­ly drawn to the retro vibe and dreamy atmos­phere of film wig­gles. As a 3D expe­ri­ence, wig­gles can be more inclu­sive. The view­er doesn’t need to free­view or use stereo­scop­ic glass­es, so it can offer a sense of depth to peo­ple with vision impair­ments. Addi­tion­al­ly, if you are post­ing on Insta­gram, they loop easily. 

    These days I am edit­ing my pho­tos in Light­room and then I import the images into Pro­cre­ate. I am able to play the wig­gle on a loop under the ani­ma­tion assist set­tings. Once my pho­tos are lined up on a spe­cif­ic focal point, I can export it as a wig­gle or add ani­ma­tion to it. Check out the VSC meet­ing video to see a lit­tle more in depth about this process. Late­ly I’ve been draw­ing ani­mat­ed crys­tals for a series of wig­gles. Some of them are fea­tured below.

    © 2022 Jas­simine Dixon

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    Jassimine Dixon (Portland, Oregon, USA)

    Jas­simine Dixon is a graph­ic design­er run­ning her own sta­tionery busi­ness in Port­land. She was intro­duced to 3D via stere­ograms. View­ing those zany pat­terns with hid­den images prepped her to free­view stereo­scop­ic pho­tos. Now she takes her own stereo pho­tos and also cre­ates her own stere­ogram greet­ing cards.

    Insta­gram-pro­file: eye.see.magic
    Web­site: eye-see-magic.com

  • Mirac­u­lous Madeira

    On my trip to Madeira, I took many stereo snap­shots. The beau­ti­ful moun­tain­ous land­scapes we walked through were well-suit­ed for stere­og­ra­phy. The snap­shots pre­sent­ed here were tak­en with my two GoPro Hero8 Blacks and the GoPro Smart Remote. Using this set­up, I could syn­chro­nize the cam­eras and adjust the stereo base. I brought a reg­u­lar mir­ror­less cam­era too, and although far supe­ri­or in image qual­i­ty, it can­not cap­ture the moment like this stereo set­up can.

    Chal­lenges I encounter using two GoPros are laten­cy between the cam­eras, expo­sure and white bal­ance dif­fer­ences, and doing prop­er adjust­ment of the stereo base. Most shots turn out well straight out of the cam­eras though, and most of those that do not can be cor­rect­ed after­wards to an accept­able degree.

    Hik­ing along the water chan­nel Lev­a­da do Caldeirão Verde.
    At the koi fish lake of Monte Palace Madeira.
    Pico do Arieiro shroud­ed in clouds.
    Walk­ing towards the shel­ter house Casa de Abri­go do Pico Ruivo.
    Dead, burnt trees on the way up to Pico Ruivo.
    Hik­ing along the water chan­nel of Lev­a­da das 25 Fontes. A chal­leng­ing work of post processing.

    © 2022 Björn Staf

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    Björn Staf (Skövde, Sweden)

    Stere­oscopy is a hob­by that com­bines my inter­ests in art, tech­nol­o­gy and sci­ence. I first encoun­tered stere­oscopy as a child, read­ing a mag­a­zine with anaglyphs. More occa­sions fol­lowed from time to time, but I nev­er gave it much thought until 2018. A friend of mine made an inter­est­ing remark when we were walk­ing in the woods; he thought his nature pho­tographs were miss­ing some­thing, but he could not point to what exact­ly. I thought it was the lack of immer­sion that our depth per­cep­tion could give. Know­ing the basic prin­ci­ples of stere­oscopy, I made an exper­i­ment with my cam­era. Back home, I crude­ly assem­bled a few stere­ograms to dis­play on my 3D TV. They were far from per­fect, but it worked! Over the course of a year my inter­est grew and in late 2019 I bought myself two GoPro cam­eras which I mount­ed side-by-side. Since then I am hooked, still exper­i­ment­ing my way for­ward.

    Insta­gram-pro­file: bjorn_staf

  • Flo­rence: a Stereo­scop­ic Walk through His­to­ry

    Flo­rence is every stereo-photographer’s dream: his­tor­i­cal palaces, stat­ues, foun­tains. Tak­ing a stroll down its old streets is like walk­ing into a par­al­lel world. Art and his­to­ry come alive right before your eyes. Most pho­tos in this gallery can be found in Piaz­za del­la Sig­no­ria or inside the Palaz­zo Vec­chio (the majes­tic build­ing famous for his high clock and bell tow­er). The stat­ues of Galileo Galilei and Pier Anto­nio Miche­li are sit­u­at­ed in a niche carved from the last inner ground pilaster in the Log­gia­to degli Uffizi famous for the world renowned muse­um it hosts. The Bap­tis­tery, Cathe­dral and Bell Tow­er are locat­ed in a near­by piazza. 

    © Valenti­na Carta

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    Valentina Carta (Brescia, Italy)

    My first encounter with stere­oscopy hap­pened in the sum­mer of 2000 when a fam­i­ly friend lent me a book filled with autostere­ograms and a hand­ful of stereo cards. I didn’t man­age to view any of them but on New Year’s Day in 2019, while on the NASA web­site, I stum­bled into the famous stereo pic­ture of Plu­to. I was hooked the moment I man­aged to view it in 3D! Fast for­ward 3 years and now I don’t miss any oppor­tu­ni­ty to take a stereo of some­thing, to the point that I like to plan trips with the explic­it goal of tak­ing stere­os of new inter­est­ing places. My favourite sub­jects are build­ings, stat­ues or emp­ty streets. The major­i­ty of my stereo­scop­ic pic­tures are sequen­tial stere­os tak­en with my iPhone 11 Pro — although I use a Fuji­film W3 when I’m deal­ing with mov­ing sub­jects like ani­mals or pic­tures where water is involved.

    Insta­gram-pro­file: valth­elon­don­er

  • Stereo­scop­ic Trip to Asun­ción

    This gallery show­cas­es some stere­os I took in the cap­i­tal city of Paraguay: Asun­ción. Stere­oscopy offers a whole new per­spec­tive to look at our sur­round­ings, in depth and in detail. These were tak­en with a smart­phone using the burst mode fea­ture to take sequen­tial Left and Right images. I hope you enjoy this lit­tle tour pf my hometown!

    © 2022 Flo­ry García

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    Flory García (Asunción, Paraguay)

    I’ve been pas­sion­ate about pho­tog­ra­phy for many years. How­ev­er, after dis­cov­er­ing the mag­ic of Stere­oscopy back in ear­ly 2019, the way I look at my sur­round­ings changed com­plete­ly. Inspired by Dr. Bri­an May’s life-long pas­sion for Stere­oscopy, and an ever-grow­ing glob­al com­mu­ni­ty of stereo­scopists, I began tak­ing my own stereo images. My favorite sub­jects in par­tic­u­lar are my home­town Asun­ción and nature. I take all my stere­os with a smart­phone and occa­sion­al­ly with my old yet trusty Nikon D5200 cam­era. It’s incred­i­ble how we’re able to immor­tal­ize spe­cial moments with just one click, but with two clicks, we can almost relive them, as well as the feel­ings we once expe­ri­enced! Mag­ic!

    Insta­gram-pro­file: ilove80z

  • The Depth of High Moun­tains

    Hik­ing offers many oppor­tu­ni­ties for land­scape stereo-pho­tog­ra­phy. Due to the diverse scale of the objects, from small, beau­ti­ful flow­ers, to trees, to entire moun­tain regions it is pos­si­ble to take a large vari­ety of stereo-pho­tos. My favourite stere­os are the hyper­stere­os of moun­tains. But with base­lines this large (rang­ing between 5~100 Metres), there are mul­ti­ple things (clouds, peo­ple and mov­ing shad­ows, cast by clouds, or even the earth­’s rota­tion) which make this type of stereo-pho­tog­ra­phy chal­leng­ing. But with some prac­tice a pho­tog­ra­ph­er can devel­op meth­ods to counter these phe­nom­e­na, and once you do, the results speak for themselves. 

    © 2021 Felix Schlicht

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    Felix Schlicht (München, Germany)

    I start­ed tak­ing my own stereo­scop­ic images in mid-2020 when I first dis­cov­ered that free-view­ing stereo­scop­ic images is pos­si­ble. Since then, with every pho­to I take I always find an oppor­tu­ni­ty to take a sec­ond pho­to from a dif­fer­ent angle to cre­ate a stereo. While hik­ing I dis­cov­ered that increas­ing the dis­tance between the two images makes it pos­si­ble to see depth even in dis­tant objects like moun­tains, which oth­er­wise would have appeared flat. I use my Smart­phone Cam­era (Pix­el 4a) to take stere­os of just about any­thing, but my pre­ferred stereo sub­jects are moun­tains and land­scapes.

    Insta­gram-pro­file: fel.3d

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